PhilSci Archive

Chance Combinatorics: The Theory that History Forgot

Norton, John D. (2022) Chance Combinatorics: The Theory that History Forgot. [Preprint]

[img]
Preview
Text
chance_combinatorics.pdf

Download (485kB) | Preview

Abstract

Seventeenth century "chance combinatorics" was a self-contained theory. It had an objective notion of chance derived from physical devices with chance properties, such as die casts, combinatorics to count chances and, to interpret their significance, a rule for converting these counts into fair wagers. It lacked a notion of chance as a measure of belief, a precise way to connect chance counts with frequencies and a way to compare chances across different games. These omissions were not needed for the theory’s interpretation of chance counts: determining which are fair wagers. The theory provided a model for how indefinitenesses could be treated with mathematical precision in a special case and stimulated efforts to seek a broader theory.


Export/Citation: EndNote | BibTeX | Dublin Core | ASCII/Text Citation (Chicago) | HTML Citation | OpenURL
Social Networking:
Share |

Item Type: Preprint
Creators:
CreatorsEmailORCID
Norton, John D.jdnorton@pitt.edu
Additional Information: To appear in Perspectives on Science
Keywords: chance, probability, Cardano, Huygens, Jacob Bernoulli
Subjects: General Issues > Game Theory
General Issues > History of Science Case Studies
Specific Sciences > Probability/Statistics
Depositing User: John Norton
Date Deposited: 28 Sep 2023 14:23
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2023 14:23
Item ID: 22597
Subjects: General Issues > Game Theory
General Issues > History of Science Case Studies
Specific Sciences > Probability/Statistics
Date: 22 April 2022
URI: https://philsci-archive-dev.library.pitt.edu/id/eprint/22597

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Monthly Downloads for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item