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The Cultural Red King Effect

O'Connor, Cailin (2017) The Cultural Red King Effect. The Cultural Red King Effect.

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Abstract

Why do minority groups tend to be discriminated against when it comes to situations of bargaining and resource division? In this paper, I explore an explanation for this disadvantage that appeals solely to the dynamics of social interaction between minority and majority groups---the cultural Red King effect (Bruner, 2017). As I show, in agent-based models of bargaining between groups, the minority group will tend to get less as a direct result of the fact that they frequently interact with majority group members, while majority group members meet them only rarely. This effect is strengthened by certain psychological phenomenon---risk aversion and in-group preference---is robust on network models, and is strengthened in cases where pre-existing norms are discriminatory. I will also discuss how this effect unifies previous results on the impacts of institutional memory on bargaining between groups.


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Item Type: Published Article or Volume
Creators:
CreatorsEmailORCID
O'Connor, Cailincailino@uci.edu
Keywords: inequity, bargaining, evolutionary game theory, red king, cultural evolution, norms
Subjects: Specific Sciences > Biology > Evolutionary Theory
General Issues > Feminist Approaches
General Issues > Models and Idealization
Specific Sciences > Sociology
Depositing User: Dr. Cailin O'Connor
Date Deposited: 20 Jul 2017 14:50
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2017 14:50
Item ID: 13233
Journal or Publication Title: The Cultural Red King Effect
Publisher: Journal of Mathematical Sociology
Official URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0022250...
DOI or Unique Handle: https://doi.org/10.1080/0022250X.2017.1335723
Subjects: Specific Sciences > Biology > Evolutionary Theory
General Issues > Feminist Approaches
General Issues > Models and Idealization
Specific Sciences > Sociology
Date: 21 June 2017
URI: https://philsci-archive-dev.library.pitt.edu/id/eprint/13233

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