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Euler's Galilean philosophy of science

Hepburn, Brian (2016) Euler's Galilean philosophy of science. In: UNSPECIFIED.

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Abstract

Here is a phrase never uttered before: ”Euler’s philosophy of science.”
Known as an extraordinary mathematician first, a mathematical physicist
Known as an extraordinary mathematician first, a mathematical physicist
second, but never really a physicist — not enough empirical cred — no one
has considered whether Euler had a philosophy of science. Even his famed
“Letters to a Princess” is described as a somewhat naive parroting of New-
ton. But Euler is no Newtonian. His philosophy of science borrows from
Leibniz, a little from Descartes (in spite of, nay, because of, his critiques of
both), but is best seen as continuous with the tradition of a Galilean interpre-
tation of the world as consisting of interacting mechanisms, and the practice
of letting the requirements of sound mechanical description and problem
solving dictate metaphysics.


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (UNSPECIFIED)
Creators:
CreatorsEmailORCID
Hepburn, Brianbrian.hepburn@wichita.edu
Keywords: Euler, Galileo, mechanics, 18th century
Subjects: Specific Sciences > Physics > Classical Physics
General Issues > History of Philosophy of Science
Depositing User: Brian Hepburn
Date Deposited: 31 Oct 2016 13:03
Last Modified: 31 Oct 2016 13:03
Item ID: 12574
Subjects: Specific Sciences > Physics > Classical Physics
General Issues > History of Philosophy of Science
Date: 30 October 2016
URI: https://philsci-archive-dev.library.pitt.edu/id/eprint/12574

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